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How to do the Clay/Matte Look in Blender

Recently, I made a brief video tutorial on how to achieve a simple clay/matte look using Blender. When it comes to the technicality of accomplishing such a task, there really isn’t much to be found. Instead it boils down to tinkering with the parameters and values until the 3D artist becomes happy with the aesthetic.

How-To:

-First, start a new project in Blender (Ctrl-N).

-Click the drop-down list that says Blender Render near the top, and select Cycles Render.

-Remove the Lamp object by right-clicking it in the 3D viewport or left-clicking its name in the Outliner/Scene.

-Select the small tab with the World icon, find the checkbox that says Ambient Occlusion, and click it.

-Set the Factor to whatever value you need: higher values result in less shadows, whereas lower values result in more shadows.

– For every model/object, your shader/surface should be Diffuse BSDF: set the Color to your liking and the Roughness to 1.

-Create a new mesh, a UV Sphere or a Plane, give it a new material by selecting the Material tab and clicking New, and name it “Lamp”.

-Select the Emission shader from the Surface drop-down list, and set the Color and Strength to preferred values.

-Move the “Lamp” either close up to the object(s)/model(s), or further away to create a look.

Another Trick:

-To hide the light source mesh from the camera while retaining its emission, select your “Lamp,” click the tab with the orange cube icon: the Object tab.

-Go the bottom where it says Cycles Settings, under Ray Visibility uncheck Camera, and this will make lighting a scene much easier.

 


For more helpful tutorials on Blender, Adobe After Effects, & etc, visit our blog.

Or are you looking for cool animated loops, GIFs, and animations? If so, feel free to check us out at lukeroberts.tv

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Officially Launched! lukeroberts.tv is Live!

lukeroberts.tv website launch banner

After months of trial and error, Luke Roberts Animation has arrived at last! With this website launch, you can now see my work in its natural habitat. If you want to reach out, you can do so here, or leave a message below. For the more bookish of you, there will be articles, tutorials, and historical animated films on lukeroberts.tv/blog, which is where you are now. Lastly, you can read more about the behind the scenes of this website and a couple long-term goals below.

Rocket Launch

The process

Rather than using a website builder (think of platforms such as Squarespace, Wix, or etc) or a content management system (think WordPress) for the main website, I chose the troublesome route of hand coding. While building a website from scratch isn’t practical for most freelancers, it’s a great learning and relearning experience for those who have a background in web development and enjoy expanding a skill set.

 

In my case, I starting teaching myself HTML and CSS at the age of 12. A couple of years later I learned game programming, which taught me the principles of programming logic. When I later became interested in back end web development, it wasn’t too hard getting a grasp of languages like PHP, especially when it came to the basics. At some point there came a lengthy period where I stopped doing those things. But now I have come full circle in a sense.

 

It was tough deciding between convenience and customization. Sure, I could have used WordPress software for the rest of the website and saved myself time. But the idea of starting a site from virtually nothing appealed to my creativity and inventiveness. When I realized that I wanted to make a system of my own, I began constructing lukeroberts.tv from the ground up.

 

However, when it came to having a blog, I decided to go with a content management system. I tried lightweight blog software at first, and eventually settled with WordPress. There are some things not worth reinventing (even then I probably would develop blog software if I were able to do so). Blogging is enough work in its own right. So it really makes sense to go with a powerful weblog tool that’s already built and ready for action.

 

Conclusion

The chief objective of lukeroberts.tv is basically the same as other portfolio websites: it is to showcase work. But I would like to go a step beyond that. In addition to offering my artistic services, I would also like to provide products, information, and interactive content that keeps you coming back for more.

 


I would love hear your ideas, questions, and comments about whatever, including this website launch!

You’re welcome to comment below or shoot me an email at luke@lukeroberts.tv!

 

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Love Me, Love Me, Love Me (1962) – Richard Williams

Love Me, Love Me, Love Me

Love Me, Love Me, Love Me (1962) is Richard Williams’s second or third animated short film, which he directed, produced, and animated. Rarely seen, Williams considers the film to be a private joke.

Richard Williams immigrated to the UK, but had trouble finding work for a year. Animator Bob Godfrey helped establish Richard’s career by giving him a job at Biographic Cartoons Ltd. This allowed Williams to use the studio camera for personal purposes after doing commercial animation and still drawings.

 

<< Previous Film (The Little Island)


Visit our blog for more animated films. Searching for cool animated loops, GIFs, and animations? Then check us out at lukeroberts.tv.

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The Little Island (1958) – Richard Williams

Little Island Richard Williams

The Little Island (1958) is Richard Williams’s first animated short film, which he wrote, produced, directed, and animated. It won Best Experimental Film of the Year in Venice, and the following year it won a BAFTA Award for Best Animated Film.

Before becoming the legendary draftsman we know of today, Williams did illustration for a living and also painted in his spare time. He detested the art world of his time, and subsequently pursued a career in animation, despite having to work in commercial art again.

 

Next Film (Love Me, Love Me, Love Me) >>


Visit our blog for more animated films. Searching for cool animated loops, GIFs, and animations? Then check us out at lukeroberts.tv.

 

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How to Split a Layer in Adobe After Effects

When it comes to splitting layers in Adobe After Effects, the process is incredibly simple, and can be accomplished rather quickly. Read the instructions below to figure out how to do it yourself.

 

Instructions:

  1. Move the Current Time Indicator to the time or frame where you want to split your layer(s).
  2. Select the layer, or layers in the Timeline panel. If no layers are selected, you will split all layers.
  3. Go to the Edit Menu and click on Split Layer, or alternatively use the keyboard shortcut (see below).
  4. Voila! You’ve done it.

 

Keyboard Shortcuts reference:
Description: Split selected layers. (If no layers are selected, split all layers.)

  • Windows: Ctrl+Shift+D
  • Mac: Command+Shift+D

 

 


For more helpful tutorials on Adobe After Effects, visit our blog. Looking for cool animated loops, GIFs, and animations? Then check us out at lukeroberts.tv.

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